A Headhunter’s Dirty Little Secret No. 1 – Poaching Candidates

Want to know a recruiter’s secret about luring top-notch executive talent from other organizations?

Timing.

Believe it or not, the Fall season is one of the most ideal times to hire executive talent for a charitable, non-profit, or social-profit organization.

Why is this the best time of year to hire? Consider the following:

  • Those who come to the realization they are ready for a career transition often do so once they return to work and daily routines after a leisurely summer vacation.
  • In many people’s minds, the start of the New Year is a logical time to start a new job.
  • The Fall season initiates the beginning of networking events and seasonal parties when natural interaction among professionals occur, making it a great time for people to organically talk about and promote an opportunity at your organization among their respective networks.
  • There is a natural breaking point in this sector around the Christmas and New Year holidays, thereby making it a great time for executives to resign and take a week or two off before starting a new role.
  • It is easier for executives to disengage from their present charitable organizations at the start of the New Year because most of the high-volume fundraising work is over after the Christmas season.

With this in mind, during this season when your executive recruiter goes tapping your favourite executives from other organizations on the shoulder on your behalf about a career move, you may find there is an overwhelming allure to a leadership role within your organization.

Problem is, many leaders in the charitable, non-profit, and social-profit sectors fail to maximize this time of year. Instead of attempting to secure talent and solidify a strong leadership team in the months leading up to the New Year, organizations focus on the panic and immediacy of end-of-year fundraising.

As a result, most searches for executive talent are pushed off until the start of the New Year, when your most desirable executive candidates have already secured roles elsewhere.

But don’t just take our word for it. Consider the data released by Executives Online in July of 2014, which affirms that January is:

third from the bottom of the twelve months in terms of new jobs. What makes January even less advantageous to the job-seeker is the New Year’s resolution effect: Candidate registrations surge in January, which may make it harder for yours to stand out. The ratio of new candidates to new jobs – a figure we’ll call the Search Competition Index or SCI – is highest in January of any month, by a considerable margin (24% higher than the next month). Too much noise in the market also makes the employers’ and recruiters’ task of selecting the right people for shortlist and hire more difficult. It may be better, when hiring, to wait for a calmer month. (Beitel, 2014, para. 3)

If you really want to be a charitable, non-profit, or social-profit organization that is truly set apart from others in the sector, why not start by growing and strengthening your executive leadership team when no one else is doing the same.

Reference:

Beitel, Anne. (2014, July 31). Data reveal best time of year to hire, find a job. Retrieved from: http://www.executivesonline.fr/en/blog/2014/07/31/data-reveal-

best-time-year-hire-find-job/

#CharityTuesday – Frontier

Social good.

Some may even call it social impact. (Yes, subtle shoutout to new friend, Amanda Minuk of Bmeaningful)

No matter what you call it, social-profits are a big part of the success of charities and non-profit organizations in Canada.

For today’s #CharityTuesday post, we’d like to highlight one such company that is doing social good and having social impact; that is Frontier.

Simply put, “Frontier helps charities through efficient and effective fundraising best practices.”

Really, what Frontier does is not simple at all. It’s that seemingly complicated-data-digital-media-online-marketing-strategy-coding-website-html-leaves-me-scratching-my-head-the-website-ends-in-“io”-what-does-that-even-stand-for-technology-stuff that they do; it just happens to be second-nature to Frontier’s team!

For example, these folks are the brains behind the retargeting or remarketing approach to targeting your website visitors, which basically reminds people as they surf the web about your charity and cause. It’s a touchpoint moment between your charity and your donors, that you didn’t even have to schedule in your calendar.

And it works too.

According to Ben Johnson’s blog post entitled, “Remarketing: How it Can Work for Your Charity” remarketing is “an incredibly useful tool for nonprofits, because users in certain industries who have already visited your site are up to 70% more likely to ‘convert’ (make a purchase/donation or sign up for a newsletter) according to a study by Criteo.”

Frontier is a company seeking to engage in social good in order to make a social impact through your charity or non-profit. Consider reaching out and adding Ben Johnson to your network, follow the Frontier blog, or check out what his team might be able to do for your charity’s fundraising needs.

About #CharityTuesday: Each week, we’ll use the popular CharityTuesday hashtag and Twitter recognition to highlight our Tuesday blog post on Canadian charities that are close to our hearts!

#CharityTuesday – re: charity Blog

Today we turn the #CharityTuesday proverbial table.

Instead of focusing on an audience of donors and the worthy causes to which they can give, we will instead focus on an audience of nonprofit professionals, and the dynamic resources that are available to them.

This idea came to me on Thanksgiving Monday as I read a post written by Brady Josephson of the re: charity blog, which happens to be our #CharityTuesday honouree this week!

Specifically, the post I was reading was entitled “Millennials Changing Philanthropy” and it focused on the philanthropic characteristics of those born in the years of 1980-2000. In particular, one shocking characteristic of these Millennials is that they are said to be transferred $30 trillion of wealth in the next 30 years.

(I had to write out the word “trillion” because, to be honest, I wasn’t sure how to represent that number numerically. Too. Many. Zeros.)

The best part about the re: charity blog, however, is not just a “fun fact” producing publication. No, rather the opposite. For example, the blog post I read offered insights into what to expect from Millennials in regards to giving trends, motivation for giving, and expectations for direct involvement in impacting change.

Truly, this blog and its writer are worthy of your time as a professional working in the charitable space. You will continue to be challenged, moved, and encouraged within your work after having read his posts. Consider starting with some of the following posts that we’ve personally enjoyed and were inspired by:

Best part about Brady and his posts – it’s free. If there is indeed a way for you to “give back” to the re: charity blog, it would be to follow, subscribe to, share, tweet, comment on, and like his posts so that your network, too, can benefit from keen and thoughtful insight into the charitable sector.

 

About #CharityTuesday: Each week, we’ll use the popular CharityTuesday hashtag and Twitter recognition to highlight our Tuesday blog post on Canadian charities that are close to our hearts!

#CharityTuesday – Durham Community Foundation

Living in the GTA means having access to a very large hub of charitable and nonprofit organizations.

It would be easy to focus on some of the larger nonprofits based in the metropolis, however, being mindful of the needs on one’s own community is a core value for us.

In our community, which is part of the Durham Region, there are many worthy not-for-profits doing important work. Thankfully, there is support for these organizations through the social good the Durham Community Foundation provides.

According to its website, the Durham Community Foundation “builds community through investments, leadership, and philanthropy.”

Truly it is building community.

For example, folks in the community looking to leave a personal legacy or to memoralize a family member, can set up a fund that can benefit a local cause. While the deadline for submitting a grant proposal was just last week, this organization accepts proposals from nonprofit organizations on an annual basis and varies its focus to be all encompassing to Durham’s charities.

Additionally, Durham Community Foundation grows and supports leadership through events such as its upcoming Philanthropy Forum, which is entitled “Be Inspired!” 

This forum, hosted on Wednesday, November 12, 2014, will host leaders from Durham Region’s local nonprofits with the intention “to help charities come together, to learn, network and share experiences so that they could return to their workplace empowered with new knowledge and tools that would help them work smarter and achieve sustainability.”

Lastly, the foundation build philanthropy in the community, and not just through the legacy funds it sets up for those in the community to give year over year to worthy causes. It also promotes active philanthropy, through initiatives such as its upcoming “Random Act of Kindness Day”.

This philanthropic initiative purposes to:

  • To build a more caring community
  • To encourage the ‘pay it forward’ philosophy
  • To celebrate Random Act of Kindness Day® as a FUNraiser, not a fundraiser

While indeed foundations have the ability to contribute to the charitable space from a monetary perspective, some foundations such as the Durham Community Foundation are much more encompassing and provide much needed support to its surrounding community in a variety of ways.

Why not get involved in the foundation yourself? Could you or your company celebrate Random Act of Kindness Day together or sponsor an event? Might you be able to create a fund which will continue to give year to year to good work in the community? Consider how you could creatively support the foundation of your community to help leave a legacy.

 

About #CharityTuesday: Each week, we’ll use the popular CharityTuesday hashtag and Twitter recognition to highlight our Tuesday blog post on Canadian charities that are close to our hearts!

#CharityTuesday – Dress for Success

Give away your clothes this week.

We’re not suggesting you head to work naked (as that would turn #CharityTuesday into #AwkwardWorkWeek), instead we’re suggesting the donation of your high quality, new, and nearly new professional clothing to a worthy cause.

What is that cause? Dress for Success – our most recent selection for the #CharityTuesday spotlight.

According to the Dress for Success Toronto  website:

The mission of Dress for Success Toronto is to promote the economic independence of disadvantaged women by providing professional attire, a network of support and the career development tools to help women thrive in work and in life.

As executive recruiters in the not-for-profit sector in Toronto, we know first hand the importance a professional wardrobe is to making a great first impression with a potential employer, but also how important it is to a candidate’s feeling of confidence and self-worth.

Consider what might be hanging in your walk-in closet that could give another woman the confidence to walk-in to a potentially life-changing interview!

 

About #CharityTuesday: Each week, we’ll use the popular CharityTuesday hashtag and Twitter recognition to highlight our Tuesday blog post on Canadian charities that are close to our hearts!

Leaving a Legacy, Not a Mess Series: Lowering the Overhead

The conversation surrounding best practices within the not-for-profit sector, particularly concerning the use of funds for compensation, overhead, and distribution to charity recipients continues to be debated.

Enter Dan Pallotta – a man who could very well be the poster child for our blog series Leaving a Legacy, Not a Mess. In his TED Talk video entitled, The Way We Think About Charity is Dead Wrong, Pallotta “calls out the doubled standard that drives our broken relationship to charities”. Pallotta’s legacy itself could very well be summed up in his own words:

Our generation does not want its epitaph to read: “We kept charity overhead low.” Read more

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